John:
Being domestic, I think, is great for everybody. One, sustainability, also helping our own economy. American made, better quality, better lead times. Freight shippers are charging out the wazoo right now. Everything that goes in the port that has to be going through customs, and then most of the time you end up returning all that crap back. Everything's junk.

Anthony:
I know from a domestic standpoint,  Fostermation especially when it comes to us like outsourcing, subcontracting, or dealing with our material vendors, we take a lot of pride especially in our local community and being a domestic partnership with our local subcontractors and our raw material vendors. You know, I'd say 95% of them being domestic raw materials suppliers. We kind of value that.

John:
But with us opening up and bringing more stuff back here to this country, like opening up-- Pittsburgh right south of us used to be a huge steel manufacturer and with all their plants closing down because of everything going to China. If we bring it out back well one, it's also creating jobs, but two, it's right in our backyard. The lead times are gonna be a lot quicker, I mean that's our biggest factor right now with material lead times for quotes and jobs. They're four to six weeks out on everything. But if you know keeping things domestic, not only helps us, it helps everybody. 

Anthony:
You don't have to deal with you know calling someone overseas and then they have to tell you that you're gonna get a phone call back. Here, you're getting a direct source, a direct representative that can hopefully answer any of your questions, your needs, immediately. That's the other thing that we take a lot of pride in is the quality of our parts and you know, I've even dealt with numerous customers that have come to our company-- that initially was with our company-- and then left to get the overseas product, overseas pricing, and then they ended up coming back to us just because of a quality standpoint and a flat out said like “we haven't we noticed the quality and your tolerances and your specs were a lot better than the overseas products.” So they initially came back to us you know like John said, from even from a shipping standpoint, those are additional charges that are accrued for their pricing, additional lead times. So again, that's just another advantage of domestic products.

John:
Most of the time I see that with one of our customers leaving for pricing in a high volume, you know a couple of cents honestly, on the part and they go over to China and they come back screaming wanting our parts back. And that's what their biggest struggle was: quality, and then the lead times. And then what happens with them doing that, their lead times, and they get pushed back even further because they have to return and reject everything. So then they have to send everything back, go through customs, and all that stuff. So that's why they said you know they’d much rather pay the higher price here because they're saving it at the end in the long run with again, lead times and also the quality, and no rejections.

Anthony:
So the other nice thing with domestic manufacturers is, I would say that here in the United States, we definitely have a lot of security measures when it comes to, you know, being ITAR compliant, whether it's being viruses, even with the internet and spam mail. You deal with overseas companies, those security measures aren't as strict as in the United States. You know we here at Fostermation, multiple customers I deal with do sign NDAs, meaning there's a confidentiality agreement between us and the customer that we're not gonna share your print, that we're not gonna share your information, and we take that to a very--

John:
--And cybersecurity too, we pay a lot of money to keep all of our stuff secured and safe.

Anthony:
So the confidentiality standpoint at least you also know everything is staying in the United States, with us, that there's no limited risk I guess, from a security standpoint.
So currently we are ISO certified, which we're very proud of because it's a formal process certifying us that our processes meet very stringent capabilities.

John:
It's a plan in place that you follow and being ISO certified is knowing that you're sticking to these guidelines, your business is run in order, A to Z, kind of a thing. And then you have a paper trail for everything that you do. That you can go back. So if you have a non-conformance or something like that you can trace it back, figure out what happened. Being ISO, I think anymore everybody's got to be ISO certified. It's very important, a lot of people require it. And then there are a few things that we've been dipping into and for military stuff. ITAR is a good one to be a part of because that just certifies you and puts you on a list for military contracts and stuff like that which go USA.